CARLOS FUENTES THE DEATH OF ARTEMIO CRUZ PDF

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Alfred MacAdam Translator. Hailed as a masterpiece since its publication in , The Death of Artemio Cruz is Carlos Fuentes's haunting voyage into the soul of modern Mexico.

Its acknowledged place in Latin American fiction and its appeal to a fresh generation of readers have warranted this new translation by Alfred Mac Adam, translator with the author of Fuentes's Christopher Unborn.

As in all hi Hailed as a masterpiece since its publication in , The Death of Artemio Cruz is Carlos Fuentes's haunting voyage into the soul of modern Mexico. As in all his fiction, but perhaps most powerfully in this book, Fuentes is a passionate guide to the ironies of Mexican history, the burden of its past, and the anguish of its present. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published May 1st by Farrar, Straus and Giroux first published More Details Original Title.

Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Death of Artemio Cruz , please sign up. This question contains spoilers… view spoiler [I was a little confused by the birth scene at the very end. Did Artemio Cruz have a twin?

Emilia There definitely appears the figure of the father. See 1 question about The Death of Artemio Cruz…. Lists with This Book.

Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of The Death of Artemio Cruz. It is considered to be a milestone in the Latin American Boom. Artemio Cruz, a corrupt soldier, politician, journalist, tycoon, and lover, lies on his deathbed, recalling the shaping events of his life, from the Mexican Revolution through the development of the Institutional Revolutionary Party.

His family crowds around, pressing him to reveal the location of his will; a priest provides extreme unction, angling for a deathbed confession and reconciliation with the Church while Artemio indulges in obscene thoughts about the birth of Jesus ; his private secretary has come with audiotapes of various corrupt dealings, many with gringo diplomats and speculators. Punctuating the sordid record of betrayal is Cruz's awareness of his failing body and his keen attachment to sensual life.

Finally his thoughts decay into a drawn-out death. Sep 28, Deea rated it really liked it Shelves: best You are on your death-bed, suffering from an affliction of uncertain causes, Artemio Cruz.

Surrounded by people you dislike, although they are part of your family, you are drifting from dream to reality, from past to present. There is no sense to the order in which you are remembering episodes of your life, both personal and social.

Past loves, treacheries, escape from poverty and ascent on the wealth scale, history of your losses come in random flashbacks to you. And you wake up and listen to fragments of conversation, try to discern gestures or physical traits of the ones around you at present and you are only now seeing the invisible threads connecting your life and your ascent to the development of Mexican revolution and implicitly Mexican history. In this random recapitulation of your life, you cling to the memory of people that meant much to you: a prostitute who loved you sincerely and not for money and whom you loved more than you loved anybody else, your son whom you lost because of the civil war in Spain, your wife Catalina who only meant to take revenge when she married you and so on.

Written in a wonderful narrative style, the story of your life impresses. The time of paralyzed branches, when even the river seemed not to flow. I mentally experienced such wonderfully narrated moments, in spite of their sadness, that I will always remember you like a character who, although highly unlikable, has a certain je-ne-sais-quoi that attracts and stays in your memory alive. They all say that Fuentes was a genius. I now know why.

View all 25 comments. May 27, Jim Fonseca rated it really liked it Shelves: spanish-authors. We are at the deathbed of a man 71 years old. He reminisces about his life and in the process gives us a mini-history of modern Mexico. He also tells us in overly-medical detail about his pains and symptoms. His wife, daughter and son-in-law are usually by his bedside and he despises all of them. Like many men who were in war, in his old age he goes back to those events as the most significant in his life.

He was elected to national politics and promptly used his position to accrue wealth. He dealt in railroads and timber and minerals and farmland. He bought land outside ever-expanding Mexico City. He married the daughter of a wealthy land owner and took over his estate. He had a son that he encouraged to fight in the Spanish Civil War where the son died.

The feeling is mutual. In the last chapter, , we learn details of his birth and childhood at the end of the book Of course he had many mistresses along the way and we learn of his relationships with some of these. Food and singers and waste all around as low-paid busboys hustle drinks and cooks slave in the kitchen. But all Artemio is left with are memories of the war and of his first love, and the taste of ash. View 2 comments. Sep 30, brian rated it liked it. We had both read, recently and with admiration, as well as a touch of envy, Edmund Wilson's portraits of the American Civil War in ''Patriotic Gore.

An imaginary portrait gallery immediately stepped forward, demanding incarnation: the Latin American dictators. Polk's Manifest Destiny; or Venezuela's Juan Vicente Gomez, who announced his own death in order to punish those who dared celebrate it; or El Salvador's Maximiliano Hernandez Martinez, who fought off scarlet fever by having street lights wrapped in red paper; or Bolivia's Enrique Penaranda, of whom his mother said, ''If I had known that my son was going to be president, I would have taught him to read and write'' - all of them pose tremendous problems for Latin American novelists: How to compete with history?

How to create characters richer, crazier, more imaginative than those offered by history? Vargas Llosa and I sought an answer by inviting a dozen Latin American authors to write a novella each - no more than 50 pages per capita - on their favorite national tyrant.

The collective volume would be called ''Los Padres de las Patrias'' ''The Fathers of the Fatherlands'' , and the French publisher Claude Gallimard took it up instantly. Unfortunately, it proved impossible to coordinate the multiple tempos and varied wills of a wide variety of writers who included, if my recall is as good as that of Augusto Roa Bastos' character El Supremo, Mr.

When the project fell through, three of these authors went on to write full-length novels of their own: Mr. Carpentier ''Reasons of State'' , Mr. Roa Bastos ''I the Supreme''. View all 4 comments. Shelves: latin-american , mexican. It's hard when a good friend recommends a book so highly and you can't come to the party. Artemio Cruz , the great Latin American novel?

I can't see it. In synopsis, maybe, it's got everything the genre requires: ex-revolutionary soldier turned landowner through loveless relationship with big man's daughter becomes corrupt politician and media magnate and reflects, on his death-bed, on all the people he's shafted. It's the Citizen Kane of Mexico. But for all that, to me it doesn't have half the p It's hard when a good friend recommends a book so highly and you can't come to the party.

But for all that, to me it doesn't have half the power of Juan Rulfo's Pedro Paramo , which treats of similar themes if less explicitly in a third the space, and if you throw in Rulfo's short stories another pages, still less than Cruz 's then I know for damn sure which revolutionary Mexican I'll be siding with.

Not Carlos Fuentes. What's good about Artemio Cruz? It's got some rip-roaring action, some serious drama, mainly in the flashbacks to the Revolution, which take up at least half of the narrative.

The words seem to fly off Fuentes's pen; it moves fast. And by the end you're left with an elemental, hard-boiled, cartoon-like tapestry of revolutionary Mexico that is not dissimilar to a Sergio Leone film, though lacking the soundtrack and the humour, and given an extra heft by its aura of historical accuracy and, yes, passion.

It's deeply-felt, but as if felt by some autistic given to only one strain of feeling — some bitter sensualist fixated on thwarted love and evil. Which is fine — of course we need those books too. But it's limited.

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The Death of Artemio Cruz

As the novel opens, Artemio Cruz, former revolutionary turned capitalist, lies on his deathbed. He drifts in and out of consciousness , and when he is conscious his mind wanders between past and present. The story reveals that Cruz became rich through treachery, bribery, corruption, and ruthlessness. As a young man he had been full of revolutionary ideals. Acts committed as a means of self-preservation soon developed into a way of life based on opportunism. The Death of Artemio Cruz.

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From The Death of Artemio Cruz to the Death of Carlos Fuentes

His social role in Mexican state and civil society relations was a complex and shifting one. Where the Air is Clear offers a snapshot of the post-revolutionary state and its national-popular ideology in Mexico, including issues of modernisation and the gulf between social classes within the bustling urban expansion of Mexico City in the s. The Death of Artemio Cruz offers social and political criticism of the outcome of the Mexican Revolution that delineates the corruption of the emergent capitalist class through a fragmented and experimental chronology. The , word Terra Nostra is a panoramic history of Latin America dealing with issues of identity and knowledge as well as a rewriting of the history of Spain.

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It is considered to be a milestone in the Latin American Boom. Artemio Cruz, a corrupt soldier, politician, journalist, tycoon, and lover, lies on his deathbed, recalling the shaping events of his life, from the Mexican Revolution through the development of the Institutional Revolutionary Party. His family crowds around, pressing him to reveal the location of his will; a priest provides extreme unction , angling for a deathbed confession and reconciliation with the Church while Artemio indulges in obscene thoughts about the birth of Jesus ; his private secretary has come with audiotapes of various corrupt dealings, many with gringo diplomats and speculators. Punctuating the sordid record of betrayal is Cruz's awareness of his failing body and his keen attachment to sensual life.

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