ALVIN PLANTINGA WARRANT AND PROPER FUNCTION PDF

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Return to Book Page. Warrant and Proper Function by Alvin Plantinga. In this companion volume to Warrant: The Current Debate , Alvin Plantinga develops an original approach to the question of epistemic warrant; that is what turns true belief into knowledge. He argues that what is crucial to warrant is the proper functioning of one's cognitive faculties in the right kind of cognitive environment.

Although this book is in some sense a sequel t In this companion volume to Warrant: The Current Debate , Alvin Plantinga develops an original approach to the question of epistemic warrant; that is what turns true belief into knowledge. Although this book is in some sense a sequel to its companion volume, the arguments do not presuppose those of the first book and it stands alone as a stimulating contribution to epistemology. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages.

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Be the first to ask a question about Warrant and Proper Function. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Warrant and Proper Function. Sep 27, Jacob Aitken rated it really liked it Shelves: epistemology , neo-calvinism. Plantinga begins by examining the Gettier-type problems that internalist accounts of knowledge face.

Having shown these difficulties, Plantinga is now able to set the stage for his externalist approach to warrant. This he does by explaining our design function: Any well formed human being who is in an epistemically congenial environment and whose intellectual faculties are in good working order will typically take for granted at least three things: that she has existed for some time, that she ha Plantinga begins by examining the Gettier-type problems that internalist accounts of knowledge face.

This he does by explaining our design function: Any well formed human being who is in an epistemically congenial environment and whose intellectual faculties are in good working order will typically take for granted at least three things: that she has existed for some time, that she has had many thoughts and feelings, and that she is not a thought or feeling Plantinga He then examines three apparent weak points of externalism and show not only are they strong points, only a fool would challenge them: memory, other persons, and testimony.

In the nature of the case we do not have basic beliefs about these three entities in the sense that evidentialism and classic foundationalism require especially memory and testimony; solipsism has a host of problems beyond this. Throughout this defense we see the vindication of Thomas Reid. The book is quite difficult and technical, though.

The sections on probability will lose all but the most formidable philosophers. Plantinga suggests this is inadequate because coherentism only tells us of the doxastic relationships between beliefs.

Warrant, by contrast, needs far more, experience among other things Classical foundationalism is wrong because it is self-referentially incoherent. It is not the case that the foundationalist claim a belief is properly basic because it is either self-evident to me or immediately present to my senses meets its own criteria: it is not self-evidently true nor is it available to the senses If a belief is formed in proper circumstances according to its proper cognitive design, it has warrant.

Conclusion: The book began well and ended well. The middle sections were good, too, but likely only of interest to the most doughty of analytic philosophers. The section on Reidian foundationalism, for example, while fundamentally sound, seemed to lack, forgive the pun, coherence in articulation. I kept seeing what RF was not in relation to classical foundationalism, but very little on what it was.

View 2 comments. May 08, Robert Masterson rated it it was ok. Plantinga makes enormous assumptions about the nature of truth, the reliability of our senses, memory, the nature of logic and mathematics, he ignores historical developments, and his reasoning from analogy is comically flawed. This is painful to read. There are moments where he realizes how shaky the ground he is building upon is.

But instead of realizing it means he should abandon the project vis-a-vis reductio ad absurdum he pushes on. He has convinced me that any philosophical attempt to e Plantinga makes enormous assumptions about the nature of truth, the reliability of our senses, memory, the nature of logic and mathematics, he ignores historical developments, and his reasoning from analogy is comically flawed. He has convinced me that any philosophical attempt to explain knowledge needs to incorporate the findings of psychology.

Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Locke, Descartes, etc did not have recourse to such a discipline. Plantinga has no such excuse, except to hide in an academic silo. I do not think he establishes that warrant exists.

This is rubbish. From start to finish. Jan 06, John Martindale is currently reading it Shelves: philosophy , religion. I am now almost a 3rd of the way through Warrant and Proper Function, and I think my main problem is the structure of the information. It almost seems as if he is reflecting on a random piles of construction material laying on the ground. For the trained builder, who knows the whole, the sequence and ordering of the parts in a completed building then, reading details about various random piles, does not cause him to get lost.

But alas, I love philosophy, but I am no trained philosopher. So to I am now almost a 3rd of the way through Warrant and Proper Function, and I think my main problem is the structure of the information. So to really be able to fully grasp and communicate to others what I am reading about, I would need Plantinga to structure the information in a foundation to roof sort of way, so I could see where each piece belongs.

With John Locke writing for example, he may not necessarily be easy to follow to begin with, but eventually its clear how each point builds upon the former in a logical manner, making it much easier to recall and share with others.

I know I have no right to complain though, this book by Plantinga is written for professionals, not for laymen. I do realize that there is a logical structure of the book as a whole, each section is meant to lead to the next section, but yeah, once in a section I get lost in the details. Feb 17, Matt rated it really liked it Shelves: philosophy.

The first few chapters of this book are organized like an introduction to epistemology textbook. They are simply written, with many examples, and cover epistemological topics involving perception, memory, the apriori and testimony. The key point or insight in these early chapters is the development of warrant.

For Plantinga, knowledge is not justified true belief; rather, it is warranted true belief. Warrant involves the proper function of one's cognitive mechanisms, mechanisms that are aimed at The first few chapters of this book are organized like an introduction to epistemology textbook. Warrant involves the proper function of one's cognitive mechanisms, mechanisms that are aimed at truth, an environment for which an organims was designed to operate in, and a certain level of certainty had by the organism.

The later chapters of this book are devoted to Plantinga's now famous defeater argument--aka the evolotionary argument against naturalism. These chapters are the best, most insightful, and most original. Jan 10, Paul rated it it was amazing Shelves: epistemology.

Excellent follow up to the first book in the trilogy. See all three of my reviews. Plantinga develops the approach he ended off hinting at in WCD. After furthering his original approach to the question of warrant, he applies it to various epistemological desiderata. He ends off hinting at his devastating argument against the conjunction of naturalism and evolution - which is developed later in WCB and Naturalism Defeated, ed.

James Beilby. Sep 02, David Nagar rated it it was amazing. Jun 15, Jay rated it it was amazing. Very difficult analytic philosophy, but good! Jeff rated it really liked it Mar 04, Isaac Barton rated it really liked it May 11, Daniel rated it it was amazing Dec 23, Mike Harper rated it really liked it Oct 11, Ali baba rated it really liked it Oct 23,

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Proper Functionalism

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Warrant and Proper Function

But proper functionalist theories of other epistemic properties have also been developed. Richard Otte and Alvin Plantinga b: Chapter 9 offer proper functionalist theories of epistemic probability, for example. Nicholas Wolterstorff defends a proper functionalist theory of epistemic oughts. And Peter Graham develops a proper functionalist theory of epistemic entitlement. A theory of warrant is subject to Gettier-style counterexamples if a belief can meet all the conditions the theory specifies as jointly sufficient for knowledge, but meet them merely by accident in a manner that precludes that beliefs being an item of knowledge. Plantinga argues that any theory that fails to construe a proper function condition as necessary for warrant is subject to counterexamples of this sort.

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Warrant and Proper Function is the second book in a trilogy written by philosopher Alvin Plantinga on epistemology. In this book, Plantinga introduces the notion of warrant as an alternative to justification and discusses topics like self-knowledge, memories, perception, and probability. Plantinga asserts that the design plan does not require a designer: "it is perhaps possible that evolution undirected by God or anyone else has somehow furnished us with our design plans", [3] but the paradigm case of a design plan is like a technological product designed by a human being like a radio or a wheel. Ultimately, Plantinga argues that epistemological naturalism - i. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Philosophy of Science. Categories : Philosophy books Christian theology books.

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In this book and in its companion volumes, Warrant: The Current Debate and Warranted Christian Belief, I examine the nature of epistemic warrant, that quantity enough of which distinguishes knowledge from mere true belief. In Warrant: The Current Debate, the first volume in this series, I considered some of the main contemporary views of warrant. In this book, the second in the series, I present my own account of warrant, arguing that the best way to construe warrant is in terms of proper function. In my view, a belief has warrant for a person if it is produced by her cognitive faculties funct

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